Atlantic Lobster

Lobster

Giant Lobster on display in the Natural History Museum in Halifax

If you look at Nova Scotia on a map, it looks a bit like a lobster claw. The people who lived here a long time ago considered lobster a common meal because there were lots of them around and they were easy to catch. But now a nice big lobster can cost about three times as much as a chicken!

Did you know that a lobster may live up to 100 years and can grow to be almost as long as you some of you are tall (3 feet)! But a lot of lobsters are caught in the traps and eaten when they are about 5-7 years old.

Lobsters start out as eggs the size of a pin head. When the eggs hatch the little squiggly creatures float up to the top and wiggle around and grow up there for a few weeks, and then those that don.t get eaten by hungry fish, settle back down to the bottom.

As they grow, their hard outside gets too small and they have to keep squeezing out of it. They eat everything they can get their claws on once they get out, sometimes they even eat their old shell. This happens a lot the first few years, then slows down to only once a year.

Did you know that sometimes a lobster can drop a claw or a leg if they are in trouble, and it will grow again!! Another interesting thing about lobsters is that their teeth are in their stomach!! They chop up their food (fish, crabs, clams, mussels, sea urchins and sometimes even other lobsters) into pieces with their claws and put it in their mouths, and then it goes into their stomach which has a surface like your molars and it gets ground up.

I am not a fan of eating lobster, but if you are brave enough to try, here’s how to do it.

When preparing boiled lobster, it is essential that the lobster be alive when it is placed in the pot. The lobster’s natural colours are blue, brown, and green. When cooked, their outer shells will turn bright red.

To prepare boiled lobster, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add about 1/2 cup of coarse salt for every 4 L of water. Sea water may also be used.

Drop the live lobster head first into the boiling water. Cover the pot and bring the water to a boil. allowing the lobsters to cook for 15 minutes if they weigh less than 1/2 pound/375 g, or 20 minutes if the lobsters are large. Remove the lobsters from the water and plunge them into cold water for several seconds to separate the meat from the shells. Drain, cool and serve.

Every part of the lobster is fully edible, including the delicate-tasting liver and the bright red eggs found in female lobsters. The one exception is the greenish sac found inside the body at the back of the head.

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